Slovenia has a tiny coastline – just 46km sandwiched between Italy and Croatia. Part of the Istrian Peninsula, the area was under Italian rule until just after WWII, and both Slovenian and Italian are spoken in all the towns along the coast. We drove from Ljubljana into Koper and I was surprised at how incredibly fit everyone in town seemed to be. Then I started to notice all the Ironman t-shirts. Kyle googled it and discovered we had arrived the day before an event. We had lunch at Gostilna Pri Tinetu, surrounded by Ironman triathletes. That’ll put you off dessert.

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We rented the bottom floor of a house in Piran, with a sweeping view of the Adriatic, and 89 uneven steps down to the footpath that leads into the old town along the water.

I could have stayed for weeks, watching the sailboats from the garden, swimming and reading on the rocks, and walking along the water into town for dinner and to watch the sun set.

One evening we had dinner at Fritolin – memorable for the boys gamely eating fried picarels (tiny fish that look like anchovies, fried and eaten whole), then feeding them to the cat on the square.

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The water was clear and warm enough for swimming, even if the weather wasn’t entirely cooperative. Our second day in Piran was spent primarily inside, as the wind was ferocious. The view was still lovely, and we used the time to catch up on schoolwork for the boys and travel planning for us.

We also watched in admiration and horror as a few lunatic kitesurfers headed out into the water. They were flying (literally, at certain moments).

Piran was our last stop in Slovenia. Next up, Italy!

2 Replies to “Slovenia, part three: Piran”

  1. Ohhhhhh, sounds like paradise. Your description does the photographs justice–or vice versa. As I described the fish dinner to Karen I saw french fries on the plate, one of Karen’s favorite foods. Ocean sounds and smells combined with french fries appealed to her. Her comment: “It’s just not nice.” Meaning we now have to go to the ocean and get french fries. We are vicariously enjoying your travels.

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